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Nouns

Galician nouns are split into two separate groups called feminine and masculine. You’ll normally see them described as masculine or feminine in text books and dictionaries.

The first words you’ll learn in Galician, refering to friends and family will mostly follow that pattern:

Galician noun Gender of Galician noun English Translation
muller feminine woman or wife
marido masculine husband
nena feminine litle girl
neno masculine little boy
xelgo masculine son-in-law
xelga feminine daughter-in-law

Sometimes it can be distracting to think of these types of nouns as somehow related to to gender of the objects they describe, because for the majority of nouns you’ll use the meaning will have no connection to the gender of the object they describe:

Galician noun Gender of Galician noun English Translation
gato masculine cat
can masculine dog
rato masculine mouse
rata feminine rat
coello masculine rabbit
paxaro masculine bird
polo masculine chicken

One method for memorising the differences is to imagine two castles on two hills, one for femine nouns and the other for masculine nouns. If you have a visual memory you might find that a useful technique, but what happens when you have groups of words that all mean the same thing?

In fact, two different completely completely different words that mean the same thing might have two different genders:

Galician noun Gender of Galician noun English Translation
lingua feminine language
idioma masculine language

In fact, the only technique I’ve found for remembering the gender of nouns is to always learn them with their definite article.

Introduction to the course

This course was written assuming you know nothing about Spanish or Portuguese, the two languages Galician shares the most vocabulary and grammatical characteristics. It’s the only online course for Learning Galician English I know of, although so love to hear from similar resourses!

One day I’d like to offer a similar course written to help speakers of Castilian which of their skills can be applied to Galician and what mistakes they should avoid. But for now this course is for anyone who feels comfortable learning basic vocabulary and grammar in the English language

Introduction to Galician

Galician is a language almost entirely spoken in Galicia, the autonomous region of Spain. Official statistics puts the number of speakers at 2.4 million, that number is the approximate number of people who understand it, sadly but fewer use it on a day to day basis.

It is a language in decline, but for those who use it everyday as a means of communication it is the only language that offers the range of meaning and subtlety that they’re used to expressing.

All speakers of Galician can speak (Castilian) Spanish to varying degrees, in fact for many there’s a political, cultural and historical fight to keep Galician in use in all walks of life instead of ceding it all to Castillian.

This course is a humble attempt by me to share some basic Galician grammar in English.

  • Unit 1 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/14
    • Nouns
      Preview
    • Numbers
      Preview
    • Galician numbers 1 to 10
    • Galician Numbers 11-20
    • Galician Numbers 20-100
    • GA 100 to a million
    • The Comparative
    • Adjetives
    • Simple Present
    • SER e ESTAR
    • Ir + infintivo
    • Money
    • Ordinal Numbers
    • Numbers
  • Unit 2 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/4
    • Imperfect
    • Simple Past
    • Contrasting the The Simple past and Imperfect tenses
    • Verbs like gustar
  • Unit 3 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/6
    • The Subjunctive Mood
    • Forms of the subjunctive
    • Functions of the subjunctive 1
    • Functions of the subjunctive 2
    • Functions of the subjunctive 3
    • Functions of the subjunctive 4
  • Unit 4 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/4
    • Direct object pronouns
    • Indirect object pronouns
    • Four common uses of “se”
    • The Present perfect
  • Unit 5 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/6
    • The future
    • The Conditional
    • Direct and indirect object pronouns
    • The indirect object: A review and and beyond
    • The preopositions: Por and Para
    • Improving written Galician: Transicions
  • Unit 6 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/4
    • “If” Clauses in real situations
    • The imperfect subjunctive
    • “If” Clauses in hypothetical situations
    • Formal and Informal orders
  • Unit 7 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/5
    • SER and ESTAR a review and other uses
    • The present perfect
    • The past perfect
    • The perfect tenses in hypothetical construtions
    • More “If” clauses
  • Unit 8 

    Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Cras justo odio, dapibus ac facilisis in, egestas eget quam. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Duis mollis, est non commodo luctus, nisi erat porttitor ligula, eget lacinia odio sem nec elit. Sed posuere consectetur est at lobortis. Donec ullamcorper nulla non metus auctor fringilla. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros.

    0/2
    • 5 common uses of “se”
    • Accentuation rules